Our Priorities

All Voting is Local in Ohio has prioritized creating a relationship with Ohio’s elected officials and county election officials to advocate for expanded access to absentee voting, increase the number of early voting locations, and end the longstanding practice of problematic voter purges.

News from Ohio


Too Many Ballots of Last Resort – Disparities in Provisional Ballot Use in Ohio’s 2020 Election

Against the backdrop of a lethal pandemic, Floridians turned out in record numbers to cast vote by mail ballots in the November 3, 2020, general election.

Although the state’s election ran smoothly, more than 47,000 Floridians—the majority of whom were people of color, younger voters, and first-time voters—had to follow-up with their elections supervisor to fix or “cure” their ballots before they could count.

In this report, we examine these disparities and offer recommendations on how Florida’s 67 counties can make the process and validating of mail ballots uniform so that all voters can make their voices heard.

Ohio Secretary of State Must Stop the Purges, Be Transparent

CLEVELAND — All Voting is Local Ohio State Director Kayla Griffin issued the following statement in response to recent revelations that Ohio’s county election boards are unilaterally and illegally removing voters with a conviction from their rolls. 

COVID-19 exposed Ohio’s voting barriers – now the state must fix them: Kayla Griffin

CLEVELAND -- In the spring, there was every reason to believe that the November general election in Ohio would be a disaster. The way the state fumbled the handling of the delayed presidential primary didn’t give Ohioans much reason for optimism.

Featured Work

In Ohio, All Voting is Local is collaborating with coalition partners to fight HB 294, which will make it harder for Black and Brown voters to make their voices heard. Despite Ohio running one of their most successful elections in recent history, Ohio’s legislature introduced this anti-voting bill. Ohio State Director Kayla Griffin debated the bill’s flaws with its sponsor, Rep. Bill Seitz, and made it clear we won’t go backwards.